Frequently Asked Questions

1. What is a clinical trial/study?

As with new medications for people, new animal drugs must be tested in studies for safety and effectiveness.  These studies are then evaluated by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) to determine if the new animal drug will be approved.

2. What is the purpose of this study?

This specific study is being conducted to test a new medication for dogs with certain types of ear problems with the goal of being granted FDA approval.

3. What are the benefits of participating in this study to me and my dog?

There are several benefits, such as:

  • Everything required by the study is free, including:

Veterinary exams

Diagnosis of the ear condition via microscopic evaluation

 Treatment with test medication or placebo

  • Appropriate ear care to help your dog
  • Your dog may help other dogs in the future by advancing veterinary science

4. If I participate with my dog, what will I need to do?

If you agree to participate, you’ll need to:

  • Bring your dog to the clinic for all of the scheduled visits
  • Follow all of the study veterinarian’s instructions
  • Monitor your dog at home and report to the veterinarian how your dog is doing

5. What are the eligibility requirements for my dog?

Dogs must:

  • Be at least 4 months of age
  • Be manageable and cooperative in a clinic setting
  • Not be pregnant, lactating, or actively breeding
  • Pass the veterinarian’s general health evaluation
  • Not be currently receiving treatment for the ear problem
  • Meet other criteria that will be reviewed with you at the veterinary clinic

6. What are the signs of ear problems in dogs?

Ear problems are very common in dogs, and signs may include:

  • Scratching and rubbing the ears
  • Frequent head shaking
  • Black or brown debris in the ear
  • Odor in the ear
  • Redness in or on the ears
  • Crusted or scabby skin on the ear

7. Can ear problems be dangerous?

Ear problems should never be ignored. In addition to being uncomfortable and even painful for your dog, left untreated, ear conditions can lead to serious consequences, including deafness, loss of balance, incoordination, and uncontrollable shifting eye movements known as nystagmus.

8. How do I get started?

Once you review the preliminary study qualifications for screening and think your dog may be eligible, complete the brief form to learn if your dog may qualify for screening.

Upon completion of the form, if it appears your dog may qualify, you will be given the phone number for the participating study veterinarian near you. You’ll be asked additional questions to help determine if you should bring your dog in for a screening appointment.

9. Are there any risks involved to my dog?

As with all medications, there are risks and benefits.  The study veterinarian will review these with you prior to you giving consent to enroll your dog.

10. What if my dog is screened but doesn’t qualify for the study?

The study veterinarian will recommend appropriate ear care to help your dog.

11. Are there any costs involved?

Everything required by the study, including all diagnostics, exams, and medication, are paid by the study sponsor.

12. What if my dog receives the placebo?

There is a 50% chance that a participating dog will receive a placebo (ear solution with no medication in it).  The study is masked and even veterinary clinic team members do not know which dogs receive the test medication or the placebo.  This double-blind, placebo-controlled approach is considered the gold standard for clinical studies, helping to ensure that improvements in patient outcomes are valid and conclusive, and not influenced by anyone involved.

If your dog does not respond to study treatment during the study, the veterinarian will provide appropriate ear care to help your dog.

13. Who is paying for the study?

A major animal health pharmaceutical company is sponsoring the study. 

14. What if I enroll my dog and then decide I no longer wish to participate?

We hope owners will keep their dogs enrolled for the full duration of the study, but you may opt out at any time for any reason.

Frequently Asked Questions

1. What is a clinical trial/study?

As with new medications for people, new animal drugs must be tested in studies for safety and effectiveness.  These studies are then evaluated by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) to determine if the new animal drug will be approved.

2. What is the purpose of this study?

This specific study is being conducted to test a new medication for dogs with certain types of ear problems with the goal of being granted FDA approval.

3. What are the benefits of participating in this study to me and my dog?

There are several benefits, such as:

  • Everything required by the study is free, including:

Veterinary exams

Diagnosis of the ear condition via microscopic evaluation

 Treatment with test medication or placebo

  • Appropriate ear care to help your dog
  • Your dog may help other dogs in the future by advancing veterinary science

4. If I participate with my dog, what will I need to do?

If you agree to participate, you’ll need to:

  • Bring your dog to the clinic for all of the scheduled visits
  • Follow all of the study veterinarian’s instructions
  • Monitor your dog at home and report to the veterinarian how your dog is doing

5. What are the eligibility requirements for my dog?

Dogs must:

  • Be at least 4 months of age
  • Be manageable and cooperative in a clinic setting
  • Not be pregnant, lactating, or actively breeding
  • Pass the veterinarian’s general health evaluation
  • Not be currently receiving treatment for the ear problem
  • Meet other criteria that will be reviewed with you at the veterinary clinic

6. What are the signs of ear problems in dogs?

Ear problems are very common in dogs, and signs may include:

  • Scratching and rubbing the ears
  • Frequent head shaking
  • Black or brown debris in the ear
  • Odor in the ear
  • Redness in or on the ears
  • Crusted or scabby skin on the ear

7. Can ear problems be dangerous?

Ear problems should never be ignored. In addition to being uncomfortable and even painful for your dog, left untreated, ear conditions can lead to serious consequences, including deafness, loss of balance, incoordination, and uncontrollable shifting eye movements known as nystagmus.

8. How do I get started?

Once you review the preliminary study qualifications for screening and think your dog may be eligible, complete this brief form to learn if your dog may qualify for screening.

Upon completing the form, if it appears your dog may qualify, you’ll be given the phone number for the participating veterinarian near you who will ask additional questions to help determine if you should bring your dog in for a screening appointment.

9. Are there any risks involved to my dog?

As with all medications, there are risks and benefits.  The study veterinarian will review these with you prior to you giving consent to enroll your dog.

10. What if my dog is screened but doesn’t qualify for the study?

The study veterinarian will recommend appropriate ear care to help your dog.

11. Are there any costs involved?

Everything required by the study, including all diagnostics, exams, and medication, are paid by the study sponsor.

12. What if my dog receives the placebo?

There is a 50% chance that a participating dog will receive a placebo (ear solution with no medication in it).  The study is masked and even veterinary clinic team members do not know which dogs receive the test medication or the placebo.  This double-blind, placebo-controlled approach is considered the gold standard for clinical studies, helping to ensure that improvements in patient outcomes are valid and conclusive, and not influenced by anyone involved.

If your dog does not respond to study treatment during the study, the veterinarian will provide appropriate ear care to help your dog.

13. Who is paying for the study?

A major animal health pharmaceutical company is sponsoring the study. 

14. What if I enroll my dog and then decide I no longer wish to participate?

We hope owners will keep their dogs enrolled for the full duration of the study, but you may opt out at any time for any reason.